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Chasing Water

Jet ski or Kayak? I’d prefer the latter speed in life, but I’m married to someone who loves fast cars and jet skis. So with some compromise I convinced him to spend a few hours on the Brisbane River exploring.

WATER: “It has no shape but can take any shape… You can touch it, but you cannot hold it… It can slip through your fingers, like it’s nothing at all. But life would be unthinkable without it.” By Hiroshi Osada

TAKEOUTS: How magnificent bridges are | A palette of colours ready to explore | reflection and light | how much I love raw umber to paint water

READING: ‘Water is a Portal to Transendence’ https://www.themarginalian.org/2021/08/10/ellen-meloy-turquoise-water/

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The Nature of Things

The Nature of Things

8 October – 7 November 2021

‘The Nature of Things’ brings together the work of 11 local and interstate artists across the mediums of painting and sculpture.

This exhibition explores our close connection with nature, and how it has offered reprieve from the sometimes chaotic world. The escape into and solace from nature is the central reflection for the artists in this exhibition; the degree of abstraction varies from artist to artist as they draw upon their experiences from their surrounding environments. Whether they are centring in on details, or summarising general impressions left upon them from a particular environment, each artist interprets this theme with consideration and reflection.

Artists: Jackie Anderson (NSW) Sally Browne (NSW) Jo Dyer (VIC) Ian Greig (NSW) Alexandra Hirst (SA) Tiffany Kingston (NSW) Cristina Metelli (SA) Rosetta Santucci (NSW) Tiel Sievl-Keevers (QLD) Claire Yerbury (NSW) Elizabeth Wojciak (SA).

“Words from Art Images Gallery”

Below is a selection of some of the works in the show. Please visit Art Images Gallery to view all of the works I have for this exhibition. Click on each image to see more information.

The selection of works for this show has arisen from three local areas I have been able to visit and explore since Covid 19 travel restrictions have been in place.

The first is Mt Coot-tha here in Brisbane. More like a bump than a mountain, but only a short distance from home where I can walk the many tracks and be surrounded by trees and wildlife. Here I sometimes sketch, but mostly photograph and collect flora from the paths. I often carry them in my hands, feel them, then leave them.

 

The second is my home. The simplicity of my garden, the eucalyptus trees and the river below. The magpies and kookaburras that come to visit us each day.

The third place is in Northern NSW along the beaches and creeks of Bundjalung country where the tides bring in a myriad of ocean flora, and each walk depending on the season brings new treasures.

Each place is a marvel to watch the transition of light and colour, new growth and the often the short existence of life.

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Tasmania : Lutruwita

When ever I travel I take note of all the elements of the landscape. Texture, line, shape etc. However it is colour that I like to recall the most. Because colour dictates the feel of the landscape, the climate, the season, the wild untouched hills to the farmed pastures.

When I get the chance I like to look back through all the photos I have taken and collate a photo montage of the colours that really resonate with the land so that in time I can use this palette to make decisions when painting. From walking across plains high up in the western parts of Tasmania,(Tarkine region) to Robbins Island then to the east to Binalong Bay or as the local Indigenous people call this land, Larapuna.

ABOVE: WATER

ABOVE: WATER and SKY

ABOVE: EARTH, FOLIAGE, ROCK

ABOVE: WATER, MUD, EARTH, BURNT FLORA

ABOVE: GRASSLANDS, PASTURES

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New Works at Boom Gallery

Tiel Seivl-Keevers

For those of you who have still got a a job, and have recently looked at your credit card statement and seen how much you have saved whilst being in lockdown because you haven’t been spending your money on random stuff you don’t need, or long lunches with friends….I have news for you.

Boom Gallery in Geelong, Vic have recently updated their online profile to support all the artists they represent. I recently send them some new works, all very affordable and at a size that will happily found its place in any home or home office, or a present for someone who is just having a terrible time.

 

Tiel Seivl-Keevers

Above: “Blue Trees 1” and “Blue Trees 2”

Tiel Seivl-Keevers

Above: “Old Man Gum”

 

Tiel Seivl-Keevers

Above: “Unchartered Landscape 1”

Tiel Seivl-Keevers

Above: “Water and Earth”

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February Goals… REFLECTIONS

Reflection on my time in Central Australia. See my previous post.

From my time painting the landscape en plein air I came home with a few smaller pieces that I then extended into some works on paper. Mostly ink and water colour on cotton rag, There is so much to take in when you are in this environment.

The shapes and size of the rocks and their shadows. Violet, Sienna, ochre.

The textures and tones of the bark on the limbs of the eucalyptus and mulga trees. The closer you are to them, the more alive they appear.

The feeling of sand under your feet and long grass against your legs. It is a daunting landscape, one that will polarise your emotions.

The morning’s clarity and silence. The heat and noise of the burning day. The calmness and sometimes formidable atmosphere as the night turns black.

 

I feel the need to break it down into a simplistic image that has space in order to highlight the individual elements.

This last image above is only about 1/3 of the painting.

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January

2019 was a busy year on the home front. We gutted our kitchen, bathroom, courtyard and laundry…amongst fixing and replacing other areas around the house. I’m typing this post in February and we still have some issues to complete…I won’t mention the amount of stuff ups that occurred, but I will say that from May to December last year I probably had a handful of uninterrupted days in the studio. Not enough to produce the work I had hoped for.

I do have a rocking new kitchen and bathroom which I love.

December was spent away in Europe for what will probably be our last big family holiday. The kids will be 16 and 18 this year so will likely want to spend less time with us once they complete school. Parenting has had its challenges too and all in all I was glad to see the end of 2019.

My studio time started slowly towards the end of January. I was finally able to get my head around commissions and focus on some of the ideas I wanted to develop artistically. Until now I hadn’t really unfolded my trip to Central Australia from last September. This is my first priority. I have seen some amazing landscapes these last few months. So much diversity in colours, shapes, and atmosphere. From dust storms, drought, fires, smoke fill oceans, icy peaks in Southern Europe, rainy grey days in ancient cities to marvellous tropical storms that have brought much needed rain. Plenty of photos have been uploaded to Flickr if you wish to see them.

So I have lots to think about. Paint about. Make about.

To do this I am being diligent and writing most mornings my intentions and plans in a journal.  I have a tendency to float too much around concepts and not stay grounded long enough to feel satisfied with my outcomes.

More to come for February.

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A town like Alice

In early September I took myself on an Accompanied Adventure, a new travel group initiated by artist Ingrid Bowen. I have never been to Alice Springs before and was eager to see the centre. We spent time at the Araluen Arts Centre for the Desert Mob 2019 exhibition and market day and a  night viewing Desert Song. Highlights on the trip (beyond the landscape which honestly was so empowering and rich), were meeting some of the locals who shared their Arts including the Hermannsburg Potters, and the Tjanpi Desert Weavers. There is so much I need to analyse from this trip so this post will be just a minuscule of what I took in.