Posted on

Manna Gum and Bogong Moths

Well, here we are in April, my last post was in February and although I had great intentions of posting here in March, it never was to be.

March saw me getting away to a few destinations both old and new. A time to catch up with friends and colleagues after two years of being locked down in my hometown due to the pandemic.

One of the destinations I flew to be was an artist’s retreat in Perisher, NSW. Organised by Sydney artist, Leonie Barton, a group of us spent four days exploring the Kosciusko National Park area with our paint and sketchpads. I dragged along a dear non artist friend of mine who needed some time away and although it was short lived, it was a real treat. I met some new artists face to face which is always so nicer than connecting just in the digital world. I am not a skier, so to go to the Alpine region and see it unveiled from its white winter coat, is much more my thing. To walk down the valley to the trickling stream of the legendary Snowy River on a clear Autumn day was well worth the hill climb back with all my art stuff.

My last big trip away to a new landscape was in 2019 when I travelled to the Northern Territory which inspired me for a good 18 months. Although my local surroundings give me much inspiration there’s nothing quite like exploring a different environment, soaking in the different flora and fauna, colours and textures. Researching its history, mapping out its past.

For now, I’ll leave my written response to this landscape for a later date. There was so much to take in and see and so much to learn about how climate change has impacted within the area, from the death of the Manna Gum to demise of the Bogong Moth. Here I have posted a selection of many photos which I took of the eucalyptus trees that have died on mass. They look like a graveyard of branches scattered across the ranges. As much as this saddens me, it also enables a visual response to thrive in my work and it was a joy to walk amongst them on the Porcupine Trail on a freezing cold, wet day.


It seems that with the recent floods in northern NSW and Southeast QLD and seeing the state of the landscape in Southern NSW has given me so much to think about.

And for the majority of the last 4 weeks, that’s what I’ve been doing instead of studio work as I managed to get Covid whilst away. In addition to this I have some other respiratory nasty that I cannot shake. So, things have been a little slow, my brain has been a little fuzzy.

April has seen me turn another year older, celebrate 21 years of marriage, and my baby turn 18! I feel like this month has just been a blur to be honest.

Posted on

Chasing Water

Jet ski or Kayak? I’d prefer the latter speed in life, but I’m married to someone who loves fast cars and jet skis. So with some compromise I convinced him to spend a few hours on the Brisbane River exploring.

WATER: “It has no shape but can take any shape… You can touch it, but you cannot hold it… It can slip through your fingers, like it’s nothing at all. But life would be unthinkable without it.” By Hiroshi Osada

TAKEOUTS: How magnificent bridges are | A palette of colours ready to explore | reflection and light | how much I love raw umber to paint water

READING: ‘Water is a Portal to Transendence’ https://www.themarginalian.org/2021/08/10/ellen-meloy-turquoise-water/

Posted on

The Shoreline Series

 

As apart of an ongoing investigation to my surroundings, I am producing a series of works around shorelines.

Walks.

Mapping.

Response.

Timelines.

Nature.

Topography.

Movement.

Memory.

Impermanence.

Landscape Immersion.

 

These images are all apart of a show for Side Gallery, Et. Al. A group Christmas Show only for a few days. December 5-9.

 

Mixed Media on Paper. 14 in Total. All the works are 17.5cm x 17.5cm.

You can purchase these via Side Gallery as a single buy, a group of two, three or more. You choose.

Framing format is versatile to suite your interpretation of each capture.

 

 

Posted on

Mooball Creek

A place I visit regularly now, but have done so a few times over the last ten years is the quiet coastal town in NSW, called Pottsville.

Here, the quietness of the town slows me down.

Located right on the coastline adjacent t0 beautiful wide beaches and open shores, it has a sense of pushing you back in time. At its heart is Mooball Creek which directly flows in from the ocean, and is a height of activity for locals and summer holiday makers who wish to float on its waters, fish or wade through.

Recently the creek has been blocked. At the mouth, there had been topographical changes to the retaining rock wall and with the way nature goes, eventually reduced the ocean waters to flow in and out with the tides. Causing risk of flooding to the urban areas down stream, but more importantly the risk of killing off the flora and fauna of the ecosystem. Reports even suggested that there had also been higher levels of bacteria in the creek and swimmers were advised not to swim in it.

So with this in the forefront of my mind of late, I have reworked ‘Winter Waters’ (2016) and now have ‘Cleansing the Winter Waters’. I’m OK with painting over older work, especially if it becomes a little stagnant and in need of some rejuvenation. Continuing the ideals of impermanence within the concepts of my work with nature.